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FEATURED ARTISTS:

GENE MC CLAIN

JIM FISH

ARTURO CHAVEZ

ANGEL ROSE

LYNNE KOTTEL

KATHERINE HOWARD

ALVARO ENCISO

BARRY McCORMICK

BARTLEY JOHNSON

KATRINA LASKO

EDWARD GONZALES

GARY ROLLER

SUSAN JORDAN

BIANCA HÄRLE

MARCIA FINKELSTEIN

LYNN HARTENBERGER

DAVID W. CRAMER

MICHAEL PROKOS

LAURA ROBBINS

SUSAN GUTT

EVEY JONES

GARY W. PRIESTER

GENE McCLAIN

DAWN WILSON-ENOCH

LINDA HEATH

MARY CARTER

LISA CHERNOFF
 
JON WILLIAM LOPEZ

SARA LEE D'ALESSANDRO

RUDI KLIMPERT

DIANNA SHOMAKER

BUNNY BOWEN

ED GOODMAN

GARY SANCHEZ

MARILYN AND HERB DILLARD

GERALDINE BRUSSEL

SAMANTHA McCUE ECKERT

SHARON SCHWARTZMANN

JIM FISH

C.E. FRAPPIER

TONY PARANÁ-RODRIGUES

FERNANDO DELGADO

JB BRYAN

LORNA SMITH

KATRINA LASKO

BILL FREEMAN


For more great local art, visit
Placitas Artists.com

Sandoval Signpost Featured Artist Gallery


One of the many rooms of the Freeman collection

One of the many rooms of the Freeman collection filled with original ancient pottery, and replicas and original art, by Bill Freeman.

Bill Freeman

Bill Freeman

Pots and Replicas

It’s hard to tell the difference between the highly collectible ancient pottery on the left and the Freeman replicas on the right.

Signpost featured artist of the month: Bill Freeman

Eclectic art collection moves to Placitas
—JADE LEYVA
Placitas is now home to one of the most delightful collections of artifacts in the United States. This collection contains ancient objects from Asia, the South Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The person responsible for creating this wonderful collection is artist and collector Bill Freeman, who recently moved to a beautiful home in Placitas, where he also has his own art studio and spends most of his time producing fine replicas of ancient pottery.

With classical music playing in the background, Bill blends his unique style with the beautiful designs that ancient people from Native American, Mayan, Aztec, and Peruvian cultures used in their pottery works.

Walking into this home is like walking into a museum of pottery and art objects that Bill has been collecting for nearly thirty-five years. In 1972, he became fascinated by the beauty of Native American pottery and started collecting it, as well as making replicas of whatever he encountered when he was hired as an artist to do restoration of these kinds of pieces. He experimented with a lot of different techniques, and ended up creating his own.

The beauty and quality of his work became well-known among artifact collectors. People could not tell the replica from the real one and his prices were a lot more affordable than buying the real thing.

Bill Freeman was born in 1927 in North Carolina. His father and mother were portrait artists. His father died when Bill was three years old. His mother and the four children moved to El Paso, Texas, where his grandfather and uncle lived and owned a flower farm. Bill tells great stories about his happy childhood there, raising flowers and working among the Mexican laborers. His mother kept her career as a portrait artist, finishing commissions her husband left pending. She continued painting for the passion of it and also to support herself and the children.

Bill has lived his life freely and joyfully, always making a living doing what he wanted to do. In his twenties, he was a cowboy and worked for ranches in Arizona, Wyoming, and New Mexico. He also worked for the Arizona Game and Fish Department in the fields of the north rim of the Grand Canyon, gathering research information on native plants and animals. At the age of thirty, he decided to be a full-time artist, an activity that he started at a young age.

As he worked on the ranches, he made oil and canvas his eternal companions. He was a disciplined artist, working seven days a week producing oil paintings and bronzes. He has produced over five thousand paintings during his lifetime. He has shown his work in many cities and has been published in several books, offering inspiration to many artists to do the same. Bill is one of the pioneers of the arts in Scottsdale, Arizona, and Jackson Hole, Wyoming, both of which are known to have two of the biggest art markets in the western United States.

This year, Bill is seventy-nine years old. He has developed long-term relationships with many of the people in his same circle of interest. He is a humble, charming, and casual man who treats everybody equally and has taught quite a few people his art techniques.

Bill is known by art collectors as a very wise man, a good friend, an honest person, and a good business man. He has made countless trades and achieved an enormous collection of pottery and art objects from all over the world. His collection of artifacts contains a variety of ceramics, basketry, beaded work, fossils, crystals and rocks of different kinds, and wooden sculptures and fetishes from Africa and the Oceanic. Most of these pieces are ancient and can be compared to objects seen in any of the finest art books or museums.

A friend of Bill’s from Arizona said to him when he moved to New Mexico, “Arizona lost and New Mexico won a lot.”

Bill’s “open art book house” contains art and culture everywhere you look—classical music, history, anthropology, archaeology, geology, and tons of ethnographic art. To visit it is truly a one-of-a-kind experience.

Bill Freeman shows his fine pottery works in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and markets his art both from his home and from the Huey Fine Art Gallery in Santa Fe. Residents interested in seeing Bill’s work and collection should contact him through the Huey Fine Art Gallery at (505) 820-6063.

 

 



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