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FEATURED ARTISTS:

GENE MC CLAIN

JIM FISH

ARTURO CHAVEZ

ANGEL ROSE

LYNNE KOTTEL

KATHERINE HOWARD

ALVARO ENCISO

BARRY McCORMICK

BARTLEY JOHNSON

KATRINA LASKO

EDWARD GONZALES

GARY ROLLER

SUSAN JORDAN

BIANCA HÄRLE

MARCIA FINKELSTEIN

LYNN HARTENBERGER

DAVID W. CRAMER

MICHAEL PROKOS

LAURA ROBBINS

SUSAN GUTT

EVEY JONES

GARY W. PRIESTER

GENE McCLAIN

DAWN WILSON-ENOCH

LINDA HEATH

MARY CARTER

LISA CHERNOFF
 
JON WILLIAM LOPEZ

SARA LEE D'ALESSANDRO

RUDI KLIMPERT

DIANNA SHOMAKER

BUNNY BOWEN

ED GOODMAN

GARY SANCHEZ

MARILYN AND HERB DILLARD

GERALDINE BRUSSEL

SAMANTHA McCUE ECKERT

SHARON SCHWARTZMANN

JIM FISH

C.E. FRAPPIER

TONY PARANÁ-RODRIGUES

FERNANDO DELGADO

JB BRYAN

LORNA SMITH

KATRINA LASKO

BILL FREEMAN

JULIANNA KIRWIN

LENORE & LARRY GOODELL


For more great local art, visit
Placitas Artists.com

Sandoval Signpost Featured Artist Gallery


Artists Lenore and Larry Goodell at home in their garden in Placitas

Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata), Las Huertas Canyon, photograph, by Lenore Goodell, July 14, 2007

Sidebells Penstemon (Penstemon secundiflorus), Vicinity of Forest Road 445, photograph, by Lenore Goodell, May, 24, 2007

Glyph, Vicinity of Forest Road 445, photograph, by Lenore Goodell, April, 04, 2007

Featured artists of the month:
Larry and Lenore Goodell

A marriage of words and image

—TY BELKNAP
Is Larry Goodell the poet laureate of Placitas? He scoffs at the title and says, “How about poet Larry-ett?” He may deserve some sort of moniker for living in Placitas and writing poetry for the past forty-five years, but it would be difficult to find one simple title to pin him down, since he’s done poems, plays, and songs. He’s played the piano since childhood and loves to play “Oh Fair New Mexico,” our state song, written by the blind daughter of Pat Garrett, Elizabeth Garrett. Jeff Bryan, whose La Alameda Press published Larry, calls his Here On Earth “a group of idiosyncratic sonnets of love and loving outrage.” Ricardo Sanchez said of Goodell, “He enunciates a poetics of madness and joy, of celebration and realization—and the words seem to dance from him. Everything becomes a work of poetical art, very political in its sense of the power and magic of language.”

Larry moved to Placitas in 1963 and Lenore in 1967, and they got married in Placitas in 1968. Larry was born and raised in Roswell, New Mexico, college-educated at University of Southern California, and pursued a master’s degree in Creative Writing at University of New Mexico. Lenore is from New York City, a graduate of New York University, and then in New Mexico she completed her master’s degree in Fine Arts from UNM. For twelve years, Larry and then Lenore lived in a tiny casita, house-sitting the old Hertford Ranch near Tunnel Springs in Placitas. It was the home of Major General Kenner F. Hertford, retired, and Annie Hertford. The Goodells’ son Joel was born there in 1969. In 1975, they built an adobe home in Placitas village on Paseo de San Antonio and have lived and gardened there ever since. Joel is currently lead man (building sets) in a movie production in Santa Fe. Their granddaughter, Lyra, goes to Placitas Elementary.

During the early years, Larry enjoyed the tutelage and friendship of the late eminent poet Robert Creeley who lived in the Village and taught at UNM. Creeley’s house was a sort of mecca for the “New American Poets” who came out of the Black Mountain and Beat Generation groups of poets. Larry said it was a New Mexico rural version of Gertrude Stein’s circle of artist friends who gathered in Paris early in the twentieth century.

Larry taught English at Albuquerque Academy, struggled with academia in quest of a master’s at UNM, published a poetry magazine called duende, and another called Fervent Valley (a descriptive name for Placitas). Lenore was the arts editor of some of the best issues, as Larry had graduated from mimeo publications to hands-on offset printing for the later issues. At one point, they traveled with their son Joel and the poet Stephen Rodefer across the United States performing poetry readings.

Lenore has always been involved in the visual arts, moving from sculpture, colored pencil drawings, and water colors. She was well-known for her stuffed animal designs at one point but through it all she has been a photographer. Together, they have never stopped cultivating their acequia-watered organic garden and enjoying Placitas’s rural lifestyle.

When they first came to the area, the foothills between Placitas village and Bernalillo were empty. “People weren’t interested in development back then, but things have sure changed,” said Lenore. “We watched the hippy movement come and go, and then we watched some of the hippies become realtors. Luckily, things haven’t changed much here in the Village. “Back then,” Larry says, “I was too young to be a beatnik and too old to be a hippy,” once again defying categorization.

Larry has been known best as a performance poet. He says, “I just can’t think of poetry as separate from performance. A printed poem is like a musical score. It is essential to hear a poem read aloud. Think of the chant-like vitality of Vachel Lindsay, the father of American performance poetry. If only we could hear Whitman. There’s only one tiny Edison recording. If only we could hear Shelly, Shakespeare, Sappho. Look at the amazing success of “slam” poets and many of those poets memorize their work, which is amazing. That’s what Homer did.” Larry’s animated readings are like improvisational jazz performances. If you’ve ever seen him perform, it’s impossible to read his poetry without hearing his voice.

He has been a vital part of the Duende Poetry Series, poetry readings performed quarterly for the past several years at Anasazi Fields Winery. Now with the help of a Witter Bynner Foundation Grant, poets might finally be paid for performance and transportation. “It would be an asset to the community if we could offer poetry workshops for kids and adults, and perhaps eventually a Duende Poetry Festival in Placitas and Bernalillo.”

Lenore is now a full-time photographer, recently retired from her twenty-five-year job as a cartographer. She grows a vegetable garden and has built the computers she uses now, as well as Larry’s new one. Having spent many years working with urban subjects and highly structured compositions, her photography now focuses mostly on landscapes and wildflower portraits in relationship with natural settings. She says, “I regard the photograph as found object. I have always been a purist, indulging in very little manipulation, either in the darkroom or on the computer, and I never crop images. That poetic moment must occur when the shutter trips. This is much the same as Larry’s not rewriting his poems.” She and Larry spend a lot of time hiking and exploring natural places nearby. Wildflowers, when photographed, must also be identified. Local geography, culture, and sense of place are central themes in both of their work.

Lenore participates in the Placitas Studio Tour in May. She will also be glad to show photographs by appointment—email her at fisheye@nmia.com. Larry’s currently-available books are Here On Earth (59 Sonnets) from La Alameda Press, Firecracker Soup (Poems 1980-87) from Cinco Puntos Press, and Out of Secrecy from Yoo-Hoo Press. All are available from him—email larryg@nmia.com—or at one of the Duende Poetry Series events at Anasazi Fields Winery in Placitas. The next planned event is Sunday, September 16 at 7:00 p.m.—all women: Arden Tice, Diana Huntress, Mary Oishi, and the wonderful Albuquerque poet, Margaret Randall. The event is free to the public.

Lenore’s Arroyo

Today we’re hiking up the coarse sand trail

to where the sun meets the rocks.

I’ll sit here & wait for the photographer

to take her picture and ascend

to where I am

There are birds, flies, space

here in this boulder-studded arroyo

where everything is pleasant, even the breeze.

And up even higher on another boulder

I look up to the streaming bell and see

a hummingbird alight on top a high dead piñon.

It sits there preening, the longest time,

and, tinker bell streaming,

flies away to the silence of my thinking.

Why is it the rarer something is

the higher in ascendancy?

Here is where an arroyo flood of rocks is

dark grays that have knocked together

to this apparent silence

as I ascend to the bright green of scrub oaks.

How fresh they are in early summer.

How laggard I am, in the climbing.

The profession of a writer steals me to the desk

too often and it never seems enough.

Going back down I am elevated

to the cooler smells.

I love the air up here, she says.

I pocket my complaints.

Farther down there is the sound

of airplaines overhead.

There is the sound of fast walking

on coarse sand.

There is the sound of my heart breathing.

—LARRY GOODELL 2007

 

 

 



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