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Throat-singing events coming to Albuquerque in February

—MICHAEL CROFOOT
There is a new phenomenon in music making called khoomei, or throat singing. Found in small musical communities around the world, this way of multiple-tone polyphonic singing can produce two or more notes simultaneously, including high harmonics and a fundamental drone.The most advanced forms of this ancient khoomei is found in Tuva, a small semi-autonomous region in Russia between Mongolia and Siberia.

There are three class acts based on Tuvan throat singing who are offering major performances and workshops in Albuquerque and Santa Fe in February. The best male throat singing group in the world, Chirgilchin, is performing at the Lobo Theater on February 3 at 8:00 p.m. and giving a throat-singing workshop on February 4, at 12:00 to 2:00 p.m., at the Harwood Art Center.

Then, I am organizing the first New Mexico tour of the all-women throat-singing sensations—Tyva Kyzy, also known as Daughters of Tuva—who will give a performance at a place yet to be determined on February 27, at 7:00 p.m. They will be leading a throat-singing workshop for men and women on February 28, at 10:00 a.m., at the Blue Dragon Cafe. They will be giving another performance at the Cloud Cliff Bakery and Art Space in Santa Fe at 7:00 p.m., on February 28.

Tyva’s multiple-tone harmonic way of singing has attracted many enthusiasts for its almost unearthly beauty. There lies a deep connection between this Tuvan folk art and the sonic landscape of mountains and steppes of Tuva. The whisper of the wind, the call of the bird, the babbling brook, and the cry of a lamb all find their place in the sounds and lyrics of Tuvan throat singing.

Tyva Kyzy performs this traditional art of singing in their own unique feminine style and utilizes a wide range of folk instruments. They have refined their abilities through training with master musicians and their repertoire was developed through long hours of practice, innovation, and by searching out the songs of their elders and of the land.


Free Internet classes at the Rio Rancho Public Library

The Rio Rancho Public Library at 755 Loma Colorado NE will be conducting free Internet classes geared to the beginner’s level.
The classes will be held on four consecutive Tuesdays beginning February 20 at 6:00 p.m. to 7;30 p.m. Topics that will be covered include Internet for beginners, E-mail for beginners, and intermediate Internet. Participants are limited to 14 people per class and sign-up is required in advance.

For more information, contact the Library at 505-891-5013, extension 8819 or e-mail: rnankin@ci.rio-rancho.nm.us.
If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter or any other form of auxilliary aid or service to attend or participate in library programs, you may contact the City Clerk at 896-8708 at least 48 hours in advance to make arrangements.


Free tax-preparation services available

Tax Help New Mexico, a program of Central New Mexico Community College, has opened its offices for free income-tax preparation statewide. Tax preparation and electronic filing is available to all New Mexico residents who earn less than $39,000 a year or are over the age of sixty- five. Tax Help officials believe that more than 70 percent of New Mexicans are eligible for the free service, but only about 6.5 percent take advantage of it.

Last year, those who used the free service received on average a $1,600 refund on both state and federal returns. The tax preparers, many of whom are CNM accounting students, are trained in low-income credits and rebates, such as the federal earned-income tax credit and state child-care credits.

These tax credits are under-claimed, meaning that every year New Mexicans walk away from hundreds of millions of dollars they've earned because they or their tax preparer didn't know about the credits. Fortunately, these people can file an amended tax form for unclaimed credits from the past three years. Workers who do not file income-tax forms because they owe no taxes may even be entitled to some credits and rebates.

Many of the Tax Help New Mexico clinics operate on a walk-in basis, and some offer services in Spanish and Navajo. Because the tax forms are filed electronically, refunds can be deposited directly into the client's bank account, and refunds can be expected in about two weeks. Tax Help officials hope the service will discourage people from using tax preparers who sell refund-anticipation loans. Such loans take up a large percentage of the refund and usually only speed the refund by a week or two.

Additional information on Tax Help New Mexico is available at www.tvi.edu/taxhelp or at 224-4TAX or 1-888-543-1305.


Chloe

Chloe

Have you considered hosting a student like Chloe?

In partnership with a coalition of state Attorneys General and consumer protection agencies, Attorney General Gary King announced a new ad campaign that aims to reduce deaths caused by youth reckless driving. Car crashes are the number one killer of teens in the U.S. The UR the Spokesperson campaign is also aided by Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) and the American Automobile Association (AAA).

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data show that, on average, more than 300,000 teens are injured in car crashes each year, nearly 8,000 are involved in fatal crashes and more than 3,500 are killed. NHTSA research also shows that teen drivers are involved in more than five times as many fatal crashes as adults. Young drivers are more likely to speed, run red lights, make illegal turns, and die in an SUV rollover.

With the message “Speak Up,” the UR the Spokesperson campaign targets young adults between the ages of 15 and 21 and encourages them to be the spokesperson against reckless driving by empowering them to speak up when they are in the car with friends and don’t feel safe. The campaign also seeks to increase awareness about the dangers of reckless driving and educate teens on how to be safe drivers by focusing on safe speeds, avoiding distractions, wearing seat belts, and the differences associated with driving SUVs.

“We want it to become not only socially acceptable, but socially expected for teens to speak up when they are riding with a friend and don’t feel safe,” said Peggy Conlon, President and CEO of the Ad Council. “We also want to educate them about the dangers and consequences of reckless driving by reminding them to drive safely, wear their seat belts and limit distractions.”

The ads conclude with the message “There is no spokesperson to prevent reckless driving.

There’s only you. Speak up.” For more information on the campaign and to see the ads, please visit www.URtheSpokesperson.com.


Women helped through stages of divorce

The New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women, Displaced Homemakers Office, is again offering the popular free classes on Women in Transition: Divorce, Money and Power, addressing short- and long-term issues for women in transition due to divorce or other life change.

This four-week series brings professionals from the community to share their expertise and assist women in moving through the phases of the divorce process. The classes include The Emotional Stages of Divorce, Navigating the Legal Waters of Divorce, Money and Divorce 101, and Where Do You Go from Here?
“With an average of seventeen divorces a day in New Mexico, these services are vital to the financial and emotional health of women experiencing the break up of their marriage,” states Lorraine Bantista, coordinator of the Displaced Homemakers Office. “It is our hope the women will find personal strength and support through attending these classes and be able to jump-start their lives again.”

The Displaced Homemakers Office will offer the classes every Tuesday evening in February from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., beginning February 6. The classes meet at the Commission Office, 300 San Mateo Boulevard NE, Suite 101, in Albuquerque. Seating is limited, so registration is required. Contact Lorraine Bantista for additional information and registration, at 222-6600.

 

 

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