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FEATURED ARTISTS:

GENE MC CLAIN

JIM FISH

ARTURO CHAVEZ

ANGEL ROSE

LYNNE KOTTEL

KATHERINE HOWARD

ALVARO ENCISO

BARRY McCORMICK

BARTLEY JOHNSON

KATRINA LASKO

EDWARD GONZALES

GARY ROLLER

SUSAN JORDAN

BIANCA HÄRLE

MARCIA FINKELSTEIN

LYNN HARTENBERGER

DAVID W. CRAMER

MICHAEL PROKOS

LAURA ROBBINS

SUSAN GUTT

EVEY JONES

GARY W. PRIESTER

GENE McCLAIN

DAWN WILSON-ENOCH

LINDA HEATH

MARY CARTER

LISA CHERNOFF
 
JON WILLIAM LOPEZ

SARA LEE D'ALESSANDRO

RUDI KLIMPERT

DIANNA SHOMAKER

BUNNY BOWEN

ED GOODMAN

GARY SANCHEZ

MARILYN AND HERB DILLARD

GERALDINE BRUSSEL

SAMANTHA McCUE ECKERT

SHARON SCHWARTZMANN

JIM FISH

C.E. FRAPPIER

TONY PARANÁ-RODRIGUES

FERNANDO DELGADO

JB BRYAN

LORNA SMITH

KATRINA LASKO


For more great local art, visit
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Sandoval Signpost Featured Artist Gallery


Katrina Lasko

Katrina Lasko at work in her studio

Sculpture by Katrina Lasko

...broad, quick, sloppy, emotionally charged techniques

Signpost featured artist of the month: Katrina Lasko
Katrina Lasko pushes the edges

—BEN FORGEY
When last we checked in on Katrina Lasko, she was well-dressed, the proprietress of a cozy but cutting edge, eponymous gallery in a quiet old adobe along the road to Llanito in Bernalillo. These days, she has repaired to the desert hills with far-off views of Santa Ana mesa and Cabezon with her husband and fellow artist and gallerist, Alvaro Enciso. They make art together there in makeshift spaces. Alvaro covers the stony, juniper yard with cairn piles and phallic symbols while Katrina takes over half of the library, spattering plaster and paint onto the floor. It seems like a pit stop for a restless couple or the birth of one of those legendary collector-artist refuges. It could go either way. Perhaps they will retire to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, or maybe they can be urged to grace and challenge artists and art lovers in the Bernalillo area with another gallery.

Katrina is now preparing work for two new shows this March. A solo show at the Harwood Arts Center is entitled “Wrapped, Tied, Glued” and will run from March 9 to 28 with the reception on Friday, March 23 from 5:00 to 8:30 p.m. The show will feature her more abstract and minimalist work, both old and new, through which she plays with totem forms and her trademark use of surprising and sensuous materials. As her title alludes, she covers objects in various simple and uncraftsman-like ways, tiling, for example, a four-by-four post with squares of bicycle inner tubes. It invites us to compare the look and the feel of rubber, say, with lead or felt—some of her other materials. The work also, it seems, exposes Katrina’s fascination with certain forms and patterns, the square and the square cross being two. Minimalism like this seems to somehow convey a sense of spirituality and at the same time a sort of mathematical obsession. Its quietness and simplicity, however, can come across as a little dull. Katrina’s expressive application of paint (when used) and the textures and patinas of her material save the work from being overlooked.

Expressionism—the broad, quick, sloppy, emotionally charged techniques—forms the backbone of Katrina’s figurative work which she will showcase at a new gallery in an old space this month on Central. Matrix Fine Art has taken over what used to be Coleman Contemporary Art Gallery just east of most of the shops in Nob Hill. In their inaugural group show, ‘Overtures’, Katrina will exhibit a group of seven plaster torsos she had originally conceived as “the Seven Deadly Sins,” but backed off from that as the work lead her down another path.

She spread a thick plaster paste over the ladies as I asked her to reflect on the five years of running The Katrina Lasko Gallery.

“I thought for sure it would be something to fulfill a kind of need...maybe not a need...in the community for seeing contemporary art. But in the end, the support was just not there and it was too much work. People don’t realize how much time it takes just to go out to see new work and find new artists, [like at] open studios at the Harwood and Masters shows at the university. If you want to show fresh things, you have to go out and look at young artists. I had hoped that they could inspire the older artists in the area to keep creating new things, pushing themselves to do something different and in that respect, I think I was successful. I tried to show things that were at least not boring to me. After a while when you go to the galleries in Santa Fe everything looks the same. Everything is something calligraphic on canvas, and then put wax on it and call it “encaustic.”

Alvaro wandered in and listened and then said, “A lot of people did not see the importance of our galleries. They failed to understand that an art gallery brings a lot more to a community than just a shop. It is a space and a place that pushes the edges of our visual and cultural understanding of ourselves. In retrospect, maybe the time was not right. And we made a lot of mistakes, too.”

We let the soothing sounds of Katrina spreading plaster take over the silence in the wake of Alvaro’s words. I immersed myself in thoughts about the wealth and wholeness that art brings to those who make it, those who show it, and those who live with it.

• “Wrapped, Tied, Glued” will run March 9-28 at the Harwood Art Center, 1114 7th NW, Albuquerque. The reception will be March 23 from 5:00-8:30 p.m.
• “Overtures” will run March 2-31 at Matrix Fine Art, 3812 Central Ave. SE, Albuquerque. The reception will be March 2 from 5:00-8:00 p.m.

 

 



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